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Kateb Yacine

Kateb Yacine,  (born Aug. 6, 1929, Constantine, Algeria—died Oct. 28, 1989, Grenoble, France), Algerian poet, novelist, and playwright, one of North Africa’s most respected literary figures.

Kateb was educated in French-colonial schools until 1945, when the bloody suppression of a popular uprising at Sétif both ended his education and provided him with material that would figure prominently in his writings. He traveled widely throughout Algeria, Europe, and East Asia, making his living at a variety of occupations.

Kateb’s first novel, Nedjma (1956), is undoubtedly the one work that has most influenced the course of Francophone North African literature. Nedjma recounts a tale of intraclan conflict against the background of violence and disunity characteristic of Algerian society under French colonial rule. It incorporates local legends and popular religious beliefs and treats the quest for a restored Algeria in a mythic manner. The novel, with its discontinuous chronology and several narrative voices, also makes a radical stylistic break with the realistic, straightforward, sequential approach to storytelling on which the North African novel had relied up to that point.

Another novel (Le Polygone étoilé, 1966; “The Starry Polygon”), a collection of plays (Le Cercle des représailles, 1959; “The Circle of Reprisals”), and many of his poems take up the same themes and characters as Nedjma. His later plays, however, turned to different concerns. Ho Chi Minh is the hero of Kateb’s L’Homme aux sandales de caoutchouc (1970; “The Man in the Rubber Sandals”). A major theme of his later works is the struggle of the working class against capitalism. His Le poète comme un boxeur: Entretiens 1958–1989 (“The Poet As a Boxer”) was published in 1994. Several of his plays were produced in France and in Algeria, where he led a popular theatre group.


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