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Good Egg - Full Length Play, Drama

Good Egg

Dorothy Fortenberry

Full Length Play, Drama

1m, 1f

ISBN: 9780881454956

More Information Below:

Description | Characters
Acting Edition

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Full Length Play


   “…Instead of slipping into pedantic debate, the play successfully broaches these topics through subtle theatrical devices.... [GOOD EGG] has a powerful message that addresses important social themes that need much attention.”The Happiest Medium   “In a heated moment, Matt says to Meg that `…when you have everything you want, sometimes you don’t like anything you get.’  Those words are powerful in a myriad of ways, all pointing to the value of restraint.  Just because you have the power and every reason to do something, that doesn’t mean you should. [the play] hits this sentiment right on the nose.”Stage and Cinema    “...a brilliant monologue that Fortenberry nails [is] the playwright’s attempt to share not only the human side of bipolar disorder, but also the scientific realities and questions about the illness.... Fortenberry tells her story through the clever technique of juxtaposition and foil, which helps the audience feel both sympathy and repulsion for the chaotic but artistically passionate Matt as well as the dependable but perfectionistic Meg.”Not As Crazy As You Think    “GOOD EGG thus effectively lays out the moral dilemmas involved in choosing whether or not to screen for hereditary disorders and diseases, as well as believably presenting a bipolar character who has a chance to describe the internal processes of the brain during high and low points.... The science-driven arguments are refreshingly poignant.... Particularly captivating is Matt’s monologue about his [bipolar] disorder.”Theatre Is Easy    “Playwright Dorothy Fortenberry doesn’t try to teach us a lesson here. Is Matt’s illness an inner demon? From the perspective of those who must live with him—of Meg—of course, it appears that way. But, as he says later on, “Maybe I don’t want to be sane. Maybe sane is overrated.”BlogCritic


1m, 1f

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