loading

1-866-598-8449

Customer Service available Mon - Fri 9am to 9pm EST Sat & Sun 1pm to 8pm EST

Passion Play (Sarah Ruhl) - Full Length Play, Dramatic Comedy

Passion Play (Sarah Ruhl)

Sarah Ruhl

Customer Rating: starstarstarstarstar (Rate this!)

Full Length Play, Dramatic Comedy

8m, 3f

ISBN: 9780573699085

Hailed by the New Yorker's John Lahr as "extraordinary", "bold", and "inventive", Sarah Ruhl's Passion Play takes us behind the scenes of three communities attempting to stage the death and resurrection of Christ.

More Information Below:

Description | Characters | Media | Author | Now Playing | Reviews
$9.95
: Acting Edition
$17.95
: Large Print
$19.95
: Stage Manager

Minimum Fee: $125 per performance


Description

Full Length Play

Dramatic Comedy

Period, Docudrama/Historic, Faith-based

More than 120 minutes (2 hours)

Time Period - Present Day, 1980s, 1940s / WWII, 16th Century / Elizabethan

Settings Of Play - Part One - England, 1575
Part Two - Germany, 1934
Part Three - South Dakota, 1969 – the present

FEATURES / CONTAINS

Unit Set/Multiple Settings

Period Costumes

CAUTIONS

Mild Adult Themes

TARGET AUDIENCE

Adult

PERFORMANCE GROUP

College Theatre / Student, Community Theatre, Professional Theatre, Large Stage, Blackbox / Second Stage /Fringe Groups

RECOGNITION / AWARDS

From Off-Broadway

“Ten Best Plays of 2008”, The New Yorker 

Sarah Ruhl is the 2003 recipient of the Whiting Award for Drama

Hailed by the New Yorker's John Lahr as "extraordinary", "bold", and "inventive", Sarah Ruhl's Passion Play takes us behind the scenes of three communities attempting to stage the death and resurrection of Christ. From Queen Elizabeth's England to Hitler's Germany to Reagan's America, Ruhl's exploration of devotion takes us on a humorous yet unsettling journey filled with lust, whimsy, and a lot of fish.

This intimate epic occurs at the timely intersection of politics and religion. Ruhl dramatizes a community of players rehearsing their annual staging of the Easter Passion in three different eras: 1575 northern England, just before Queen Elizabeth outlaws the ritual; 1934 Oberammergua, Bavaria, as Hitler is rising to power; and Spearfish, South Dakota, from the time of Vietnam through Reagan's presidency. In each period, the players grapple in different ways with the transformative nature of art, and politics are never far in the background, as Queen Elizabeth, Hitler, and Reagan each appear, played by a single commanding actor.


REVIEWS
"Her [Ruhl’s] unmistakable voice—poetic and quirky, underpinned with serious feeling and even more serious intelligence—trumpets forth in brash, impressive form in this ambitious...play." - The New York Times, Read More

"Ruhl’s voice seems to retreat beyond the sphere of the play, performing that special vanishment that good writers—and good gods—know best how to do…Critic’s Pick!" - Time Out New York, Read More

"Let’s just get the superlatives out of the way. Sarah Ruhl’s Passion Play is the most exciting, stimulating, and thrilling piece of theater to hit New York since Angels in America." - Backstage, Read More


Check out these photos from Yale Repertory Theatre's production of Passion Play in September 2008.


RELATED ARTICLES ON BREAKING CHARACTER 

An Epic Testament to theatre: The Premiere of Saraha Ruhl's PASSION PLAY 
by Marissa Arellano
January 19, 2016

The Power of Storytelling in Sarah Ruhl's PASSION PLAY 
by Julia Izumi
January 28, 2016


An early version of Passion Play was produced in workshop at the Tristan Bates Theatre in London in July 2002. It was directed by Mark Wing-Davey.
Passion Play received its world premiere at Arena Stage in Washington, D.C., on September 2, 2005. It was directed by Molly Smith.

Characters

CASTING

8m, 3f

CASTING ATTRIBUTES

Ensemble cast, Non-Traditional casting, Reduced casting (Doubling Possible), Flexible casting

CASTING NOTES

Cast doubles roles for each separate Part of Passion Play

PONTIUS THE FISH GUTTER / FOOTSOLDIER / P
JOHN THE FISHERMAN / ERIC / J
MARY 1 / ELSA
MARY 2
VISITING FRIAR / VISITING ENGLISHMAN, OR SIMON LILLY / VA PSYCHIATRIST
VILLIAGE IDIOT / VIOLET
CARPENTER 1, SAM / CARPENTER 2, JOHANN / ENSEMBLE
CARPENTER 2, SIMON / LUDWIG / ENSEMBLE
DIRECTOR / ROCHUS SCHALLHAMMER
MACHINIST / GERMAN OFFICER / YOUNG DIRECTOR
QUEEN ELIZABETH / HITLER / PRESIDENT REGAN
Videos
  • Sarah Ruhl on Passion Play

  • Passion Play

  • Sarah Ruhl on "Poor Theatre"

  • Sarah Ruhl

Author
Sarah Ruhl

Sarah Ruhl

Sarah Ruhl’s plays include For Peter Pan on her 70th Birthday, The Oldest Boy, In the Next Room, or the vibrator play, The Clean House, Passion Play, Dead Man’s Cell Phone, Melancholy Play; Eurydice; Orlando, Late: a cowboy song, Dear Elizabeth and Stage Kiss. She has been a two-time Pulitzer prize finalist and a Tony award nominee. Her plays have been produced on Broadway at the Lyceum by ... view full profile

Now Playing
Loading
Producer
City
State
Opening
Closing
Reviews
Joshua Livingston 4/2/2015 1:27 PM
Aaron Ricciardi 5/8/2013 9:53 AM
Every time I read PASSION PLAY, I fall more in love with it, but grow more aware of its many flaws.  It is an untidy experiment, a play to be solved.

At times, the scenes in PASSION PLAY are pure plot with too much subtextual possibility, giving directors an unfair responsibility. Some dialogue lacks the well of emotion underlying the text of other Ruhl plays like THE CLEAN HOUSE or LATE: A COWBOY SONG. P’s PTSD in Part 3 feels a bit contrived, and it feels lazy to discontinue to the gay motif for Part 3. Parts 1 and 3 both end with monologues from the Pontius character, and, despite magnificent language, they each feel like a cop-out.

But then there are moments so sublime that you remember why Vogel says that reading a Ruhl play is “a little akin to falling in love:” In Part 1, when Pontius asks Mary 1 to run away, and Mary 2 asks the same. In Part 2, the first and last scenes between Eric and the Footsoldier. And, in Part 3, when Queen Elizabeth reappears during P’s proposal. Terribly clever is how, as the setting moves closer to present day, the writing gets more naturalistic. For example, the prologues of each act: Part 1’s is Shakespearean. Part 2’s reads like a travel brochure. Part 3’s sounds like directions from a gas station employee.

Regardless of its weaknesses, the whole here amounts to way more than the sum of its parts. The play’s socio-political ideas, plus the visual world, the Village Idiot, the Elizabeth-Hitler-Reagan conceit, and the lush language create a stunning event. Specifically, Part Three’s anachronisms make for a thrilling conclusion, both satisfying and disjointed at once. This play is about small-town production values, making it easily producible, but it is challenging—as all powerful, provocative, progressive plays are.

You May Also Like

See all

Customers Also Bought