loading

1-866-598-8449

Customer Service available Mon - Fri 9am to 9pm EST Sat & Sun 1pm to 8pm EST

Rough Theatre I - Short Play

Rough Theatre I

Samuel Beckett

Customer Rating: starstarstarstarstar (Rate this!)

Short Play

2m

ISBN: 9780802150462

A blind beggar, sitting on a folding-stool, is scraping away on his fiddle in the hope of getting a few coins from any passers-by. This day however a wheelchair-using man is drawn to his playing, and for whatever reasons, they each find themselves alone in the world.

More Information Below:

Description | Characters | Author | Reviews
$14.00
: Ends and Odds

Minimum Fee: $45 per performance


Description

Short Play

FEATURES / CONTAINS

Exterior Set

The day is wintry, grey and sunless. A blind beggar, sitting on a folding-stool, is scraping away on his fiddle in the hope of getting a few coins from any passers-by. Three times in his opening speech he emphasises that he is “a poor old man.” His bowl is quite empty though; it has been some time since he has had contact with anyone. This day however a wheelchair-using man is drawn to his playing. He is similarly disabled having lost one leg (“It went bad and was removed”). Now, for whatever reasons, they each find themselves alone in the world.
Characters

CASTING

2m

Author
Samuel Beckett

Samuel Beckett

Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) is widely recognized as one of the greatest dramatists of the twentieth century. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1969. Mr. Beckett is most renowned for his play Waiting for Godot which launched his career in theatre. He then went on to write numerous successful full-length plays, including Endgame in 1957, Krapp’s Last Tape in 1958, and Happy Days in ... view full profile

Other Samuel Beckett titles:

Now Playing
Loading
Producer
City
State
Opening
Closing
Reviews
Alyson Fortner 4/29/2013 11:21 AM
This particular short play of Samuel Beckett’s stands out as being one with most similarities to arguably his most famous work, Waiting for Godot. With a vaguely post-apocalyptic setting and a pair of poor men with no truly tangible knowledge about their setting, Rough for Theatre I explores the limits of human desperation and how the longing for human connection can be consuming. Beckett creates a world with high stakes, deep imagery, and missed human connections that provide insight into what humans need most.

The characters, A and B, each have ailments that require them to be dependent on others: A is blind, while B is missing a leg and is stuck in a wheelchair. In another world with different circumstances A and B would unite forces and learn to help each other. Although Beckett at some moments does offer this as a possibility, but it seems like this play is actually about human connection that fails. Whether this is because of the urgency of survival, the mysteries of the world, or something in the characters’ pasts is unknown. It is clear in the world of this play, as in many others of his works, that what is left unwritten and undefined is just as crucial to determining the smell, sound, aesthetics, and tone as what is actually written. That is the challenge of producing Beckett’s works, to adequately portray his text by making decisions about what is left out that does not overwhelm or skew the text.

Rough for Theatre I depicts complex characters looking for companionship amidst the mysterious “ruins” of their environment. Beckett’s work is so intriguing and simultaneously bewildering since it articulates such deeply human themes with elusive dialogue and undefined mysteries. This play is an expert example of this enticing dichotomy.

You May Also Like

See all

Customers Also Bought