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Miss Julie (Stockenstrom, trans.) - Full Length Play, Drama

Miss Julie (Stockenstrom, trans.)

Truda Stockenstrom, August Strindberg

Customer Rating: starstarstarstarstar (Rate this!)

Full Length Play, Drama

1m, 2f

ISBN: 9781566631099

Translated by Truda Stockenstrom

Stockenstrom's translation of Ibsen's classic.

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Description | Characters | Author(s) | Reviews
$9.95
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Minimum Fee: $75 per performance


Description

Full Length Play

Drama

Miss Julie has power over Jean because she is upper-class. Jean has power over Miss Julie because he is male and uninhibited by aristocratic values. The count, Miss Julie's father (an unseen character), has power over both of them since he is a nobleman, an employer, and a father. Over the course of the play, Miss Julie and Jean battle for control, which swings back and forth between them.

Censored for its shocking content, MISS JULIE revolves around a familiar Strindbergian encounter: a quasi-Darwinian struggle across sex and class lines.

MISS JULIE (1888) remains Strindberg's most famous work. In the history of drama, it is primarily canonized for its stylistic innovations.

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1m, 2f

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Reviews
Jennifer Spader 11/27/2013 4:33 PM
I feel as though this play could be found with the works of Friedrich Nietzsche looking into master/slave morality. Miss Julie (daughter of the estate's master/owner) and Jean (a servant of the house) clash over and over in this play illustrating a fight for power over one another, but also showing the dependency of the two on one another. Who is indeed the "slave"? While Jean is servant to his masters, Julie is servant to duty.

The biggest question that I was faced with was how does one escape the confines of duty? In the case of Julie and Jean, duty is what gives them the means to live, both metaphorically and literally. Is there a simple or clean way to escape your expectations or role?

Was this my favorite play? Maybe not. Did it leave me with thoughts and feelings to be pondered? Absolutely.

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